Academics 2018-04-16T05:48:39+00:00

Academics

THE JOURNEY TO BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL LIFELONG LEARNER FALLS ON THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT.

Encore offers opportunities for students to create their own lifelong learner path.  Encore has developed multiple six year plans depending on the student need for academic rigor.  Encore believes in tailoring education paths based on student need.  The five most traditional six year plans are described here.

TRADITIONAL A-G COLLEGE PREP SIX YEAR PLAN – traditional path A - G.docx

INTERMEDIATE A-G COLLEGE PREP SIX YEAR PLAN (ADVANCED SCIENCE) – intermediate path.docx

HONORS A-G COLLEGE PREP SIX YEAR PLAN –honors path.docx

MOST ADVANCED A-G COLLEGE PREP SIX YEAR PLAN – MOST RIGOROUS PATH FOR STUDENT.docx

INDEPENDENT STUDY A-G COLLEGE PREP SIX YEAR PLAN – independent study.docx

ENCORE’S HIGH SCHOOL PREP COURSES (Junior High) – 

Encore offers limited enrollment for 7th and 8th grade in preparation for the high school experience within Encore.

Junior high students take four core academic classes and a skills class in their course block.

In Junior high, Encore spends time filling gaps within math and reading in skills classes and helps students learn how to become great students.  Starting in the 8th grade, Encore offers HONORS courses for students that are craving a more rigorous academic schedule in preparation for high school.

Junior high students are able to take preparatory SAT exams starting in 8th grade to help them understand how to take the ever important college prep exam, the SAT.

Students that want even more academic rigor can do so by taking high school classes to make sure that they have the academic push.

ENCORE’S HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM – 

Every student that is enrolled at Encore is expected to complete all of the admissions requirement courses for university application by the time they graduate from high school with a “C” or better.  The counseling department will make sure that our students are enrolled in each of the courses outlined by the University of California college board (known as A-G requirements) to ensure student success.

Beginning in 2017, students that earn less than a “C” in any A-G course will be required to make up the course using Encore’s credit recovery and/or summer school programs.  Encore is dedicated to helping students qualify for college.

At the high school level, students can enroll in regular, HONORS, and AP courses for completion.  Students wishing to take college level AP exams are encouraged to join the AP study team.  The AP study team spends the year studying for the AP exams held in the spring of each year.  Students can earn both the extra point for their overall grade point average AND take the exam to earn college credit with the AP study team.

ENROLLING AT ENCORE AS AN ADVANCED STUDENT – 

Encore celebrates academic achievement.  For most of our students, enrolling in the traditional six year plan in preparation for college acceptance using our regular or HONORS track will provide the appropriate amount of rigor to challenge the student.  In some cases, and sometimes in only one or two subjects, a student may wish to exempt a class by testing out of it.  While exempting a class lets the student skip a course they may have already mastered, it does not count toward high school credit to complete the A-G courses needed for admissions into college.

For students wishing to test out of a course, they must complete the end of the year benchmark exam for the course they are wishing to exempt with an 85% or higher.  For students wishing to schedule the benchmark test to exempt a class, they should make an appointment with the Dean that is in charge of academics on their campus.  Students wishing to take a class exemption must test prior to the first day of school.

In Hesperia, contact Dean of Academics, Ms. Roach to request the test at croach@encorehighschool.com

In Riverside, contact Dean of Academics, Ms. Meyer to request the test at jmeyer@encorehighschool.com

It is the goal of Encore to teach our students how to build a successful future using the resources and skills they learn in high school.  As an arts school, the technical education components offered are combined with hands-on experience in the arts industry.  Encore students that take an active role in the projects offered on campus will learn the following key pieces to working in the arts industry:

  1. Work ethic & Time management
  2. Project planning, follow through, and execution
  3. Proper etiquette for artists within their field
  4. Hands-on training and master classes from people within the industry
  5. How to start to look for jobs within their chosen career arts field

YOUTUBE

In the progressive world of social media and social media as an industry, students should be driven to understand what the machine of YouTube is and how this works as a way to springboard careers.  One of Encore’s career components is a new faction of what Encore offers as ancillary programs.  This is Encore’s YouTube Department.  The world of social media ha changed the way people do business in the world of advertising, research, and in the arts world.  Encore believes that giving students the opportunity to explore this world will help give them the competitive edge after high school.

In the current state of YouTube, there is more to the platform than just watching cats doing funny things.  This billion dollar corporation has helped people create private million dollar businesses.  YouTube (owned by Google) has over 400 million hours of content uploaded every 5 minutes on average.  YouTube has become the way that artists display their talents and for people to create businesses.  As an artist, if you do not have an official YouTube channel, you are closing yourself off to most prospective managers and casting directors.  Artist business cards and headshots are now referring potential employers to social media platforms.  Encore’s mission is to get our students comfortable in looking at the social media platforms as a way of advertising themselves for future employers.

YOUTUBE IN ADVERTISING – 

Encore students that are artists should be creating their own YouTube Channels.  For students that have their own OFFICIAL YouTube channels (ones used for the purpose of building a business or artist personality), students can turn in their official channel name to the front office or email the channel name to our Digital Media Manager, Kelsey White, kwhite@encorehighschool.com.  Once reviewed, Encore can place it on the Featured Channels list on Encore TV’s channel.  Each quarter, Encore will hold a student contest for Encore TV featured channels to see which YouTuber can gain the most views, likes, or subscribers on their channel by following the rules of the quarterly competition.  Winners will receive gift cards while everyone will gain the understanding of how to grow and advertise their social platform business.

YOUTUBE IN RESEARCH – 

Encore students will also be given the opportunity to seek out specific research and create specific research using social media platforms.  During the 2016/2017 school year, Encore will be developing a “teen tutoring” research YouTube channel that can help fellow Encore students and other students worldwide learn about things that are being taught within the classroom.

  • Students will be given an opportunity to create topic specific academic content for extra credit within all of their academic classes
  • Completed topic specific content will be turned in to the academic teacher, it will be placed live on Encore’s new tutoring YouTube Channel
  • Once the YouTube video is approved by the academic teacher, it will be placed live on Encore’s tutoring YouTube Channel
  • Students will then be able to advertise their video to gain views  The more views a video gains, the more a student can earn in credit
  • Students are encouraged to drive organic traffic to their research video
  • Top five newly viewed research videos each month will earn gift cards
  • All approved videos will earn extra credit
  • Students creating 10 or more academic videos with 100 or more organic views will receive a spirit letter
  • For every student created video that earns 100 or more organic views, the student will receive a gift card to either fast food restaurants, ITunes, retail locations, or the student store

YOUTUBE IN THE ARTS WORLD – 

Encore students wishing to pursue a career in the arts world are encouraged to start an official YouTube channel to promote themselves to the world outside of Encore.  There will be quarterly seminars given to the students of Encore to help them design and create a viable YouTube channel for the purpose of self promotion.

At these quarterly seminars, students will be asked to give their YouTube channel to the presenter.  Encore will review the channels and give critiques on the channels to help the students refine what they do to be more effective.

Encore will highlight and promote YouTube channels on the Encore networks to help students gain subscribers to their official channels.  Encore will also choose campus performers for lunch rallies and other special events throughout the year based on YouTube content.

COLLEGE PREPARATORY EDUCATION

Click the picture below to see the details.

On top of the course requirements, students should take the PSAT and must take either the SAT or ACT to be considered for admission to most colleges.

What are the exact requirements for me to get into the college I am looking at?
Every college is different. If you enter the Encore Academic Society and complete the six-year coursework related to going to college, you will have a good understanding of what you need to get into the college of your choice. However, Encore has adopted the general standards for acceptance to a lot of college and university programs as our basic graduation requirements. The “A-G requirements” were developed in cooperation between the California State University and the University of California boards and are used all over the world.

The exact definition of A-G is:
“Courses from California high schools and online schools used to satisfy the “a-g” subject requirements must be approved by UC and appear on the institution’s “a-g” course list. These courses are to be academically challenging, involving substantial reading, writing, problems and laboratory work (as appropriate), and show serious attention to analytical thinking, factual content and developing students’ oral and listening skills.”
Check the college and university admission requirements for the colleges that are under consideration for your specific admission.

I have so many more classes than what is on the A-G list. What do I do?

  • The additional classes that you take at Encore are going to accomplish many things for you as a student.
  • The average, full time student graduating from Encore will complete 360 high school semester units by the time they graduate. This is very high. The average high school student going to an average high school will graduate with about 280 units.
  • For universities, this gives you an edge because your “well rounded” skills are going to show up on your official transcripts.
  • You have time to really hone in and master your skills for your fine arts.
  • You have time to make up classes to get a better grade to be considered for college academically.
  • If you are in a hurry, there is the option of graduating early (Although we do not recommend that. You have the rest of your life to be an adult. Take advantage of the free offerings in high school because nothing is free after graduation.) If you do want to look at graduating early, talk to a counselor right away so they can discuss what that path looks like.
  • Try new things. Once you choose an Arts House, you should take the opportunity to drink in all that is offered at Encore for FREE. Classes at the college level are so expensive and what if you hate it? Test the waters when the price is good….
  • Use your opportunity for extra classes to round out your education. Pursue becoming the most knowledgeable you that you can become.
  • Students in grades 7 and 8 can take high school academic classes as long as they are also enrolled in the requisite courses for grades 7 and 8. Students choosing to do this would give up arts classes to gain academic rigor. See a counselor for more information.

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

At Encore, students have several opportunities to work on their academic achievements.  The red letter “E” for Letterman’s sweaters and jackets signifies academic achievement.  Students can get the red letter “E” for having perfect attendance for the entire school year, earning a 3.0 or higher Grade Point Average at the end of each semester, or scoring ADVANCED on both sections of the CAASPP test.

JUNIOR HIGH & HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMIC LETTERS

Students that have earned a 3.0 or higher will receive a certificate in February for Semester 1 and in the following September for Semester 2.  The certificates can be taken to the student store to redeem for the red letter “E” or for the service bars that go with them.  Each student can receive one small red letter “E” in junior high AND THEN one large letter “E” while in high school.  The sweaters and jackets can be ordered and purchased from the student store (Hesperia) or third floor services (Riverside).

PERFECT ATTENDANCE

Consistent attendance is imperative to academic achievement.  For students that have perfect attendance, this means that you are present and on time for every class during a calendar month, you will receive a $10 coupon toward the purchase of a Letterman’s sweater or jacket.

ACADEMIC RENAISSANCE RALLY

At the end of the first semester, students that have earned an academic GPA of 3.0 or higher are recognized as part of the Renaissance rally in February.  The themes change and are set by Encore’s ASB department.  There are three levels of recognition for students with academic achievement.

  1. HONORS – students that have earned an academic GPA 0f 3.0  – 3.49 during the first semester will receive a certificate.
  2. HIGH HONORS – students that have earned an academic GPA of 3.5 – 3.99 during the first semester will receive a certificate and a special gift (usually ice cream or candy).
  3. DEAN’S HONORS – students that have earned an academic GPA of 4.0 or higher during the first semester will receive a certificate and a special party (usually lunch and a movie).

GRADUATING WITH ACADEMIC HONORS

HONORS – Students that have earned a cumulative GPA of 3.0 to 3.49 earn the distinction of graduating with a student “honors” stole at graduation

HIGH HONORS – Students thaat have earned a cumulative GPA of 3.5 to 3.99 earn the distinction of graduating with a student “High Honors” stole at graduation.

DEAN’S HONOR ROLL – Students that have earned a cumulative GPA of 4.0 or higher earn the distinction of graduating with a student “Dean’s Honors” stole at graduation.

SALUTATORIAN – Upon graduating, students earning the second highest cumulative academic GPA with the highest number of academic credits earned of the graduating class will be named the salutatorian and will wear a student “salutatorian” stole at graduation and will give the salutatorian speech.  Salutatorian needs to attend Encore for a minimum of three semesters.

VALEDICTORIAN – Upon graduating, students earning the highest cumulative academic GPA with the highest number of academic credits earned of the graduating class will be named valedictorian and will wear a student “valedictorian” stole at graduation and will give the valedictorian speech.  Valedictorian needs to attend Encore for a minimum of three semesters.

ENGLISH

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JR. HIGH ENGLISH
COURSE: READING LANGUAGE ARTS 7
COURSE NUMBER: 215
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, This is a 7th grade course
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: The language arts processes of reading, writing, listening, and speaking are taught in an integrated and inter-related manner. Course components include the study of rich and varied literature, writing in the genres of narrative, persuasive, expository, response to literature and summary of reading materials.

COURSE: READING LANGUAGE ARTS 8
COURSE NUMBER: 220
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, This is an 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Reading Language Arts 7
DESCRIPTION: Instruction advocates techniques for analyzing literature and multiple opportunities for practice. Strategies involve patterns and procedures for students to use the writing process to produce varied types of writing. Instruction provides students with necessary skills to write various types of genres and develop an appreciation of writer’s techniques applied within known pieces of literature.

COURSE: READING LANGUAGE ARTS 8 HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 94
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, This is an 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in four prior quarters of Reading Language Arts 7
DESCRIPTION: Building on the foundation of Reading Language Arts 8, his honors course uses a variety of strategies to aide students in using deeper critical thinking. With more extensive reading projects, student work to build deeper skills for writing and reading comprehension.

HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH

COURSE: ENGLISH I
COURSE NUMBER: 76 A-G: Yes, 10 units, This is a 9th grade course
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Course establishes skills and fundamental concepts in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students develop reading fluency and depth with a selection of short stories, novels, and essays. There is a focus on clear and effective writing and speaking through word choice and organization of thoughts in a variety of essays, speeches, presentations, and collaborative work. Course uses computer technology for a portion of the curriculum.

COURSE: ENGLISH I HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 96 A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 9th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four prior quarters in RLA 8 or “B” or higher in RLA 8 Honors
DESCRIPTION: Building off of the curriculum in English I, this course involves more in depth reading and additional critical thinking projects to help students gain a deeper understanding of the written works within the curriculum. This course uses novels, computer technology, and a variety of English resources.

COURSE: ENGLISH II
COURSE NUMBER: 225
A-G: 10 units, 10th grade course
PREREQUISITE: English I
DESCRIPTION: A survey of World Literature and literary elements of plot including such novels as “Of Mice and Men”, and “Much Ado About Nothing.” The writing component focuses on literary analysis and interpretation, with an emphasis on organization, structure and theses development.

COURSE: ENGLISH II HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 98
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 10th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four prior quarters English I or “B” or higher in English I Honors
DESCRIPTION: Students explore literary classes from around the world to develop a global perspective while evaluating fiction, prose, and poetry to increase critical thinking and literary analysis. Major works include, “Animal Farm”, “Farewell to Manzanar”, “Night”, and “Much Ado About Nothing.”

COURSE: ENGLISH III
COURSE NUMBER: 244
A-G: 10 units, 11th grade course
PREREQUISITE: English II
DESCRIPTION: A survey of American Literature such as “Huck Finn” and “The Great Gatsby” as well as plays, poems, and non-fiction for critical thinking and literary essays. Coherent, clear, and effective communication is developed through a variety of writing experiences.

COURSE: ENGLISH III HONORS – AMERICAN LITERATURE
COURSE NUMBER: 99
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 11th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four prior quarters in English II or “B” or higher in English II Honors
DESCRIPTION: Building from the curriculum from English III, students explore nonfiction and fiction by great American Authors to determine what it means to be an American while evaluating prose, poetry, and novels for sophisticated verbal and written expression. Students wishing to take the AP exam should take this course and join the AP study team.

COURSE: ENGLISH IV – BRITISH LITERATURE
COURSE NUMBER: 100
A-G: 10 units, 12th grade course
PREREQUISITE: English III or Mythology
DESCRIPTION: Course surveys British Literature from the Anglo Saxons to present day. Using technology, novels, and resource materials: students write fictional narratives, respond to literature, create multimedia presentations, and complete individual and group projects.

COURSE: ENGLISH IV HONORS – BRITISH LITERATURE
COURSE NUMBER: 191
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 12th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four prior quarters in English III, Mythology, or “B” or higher in English III Honors
DESCRIPTION: Building from the curriculum of English IV, this course takes a more in depth approach to reading and writing comprehension of British Literature. Students wishing to take the AP exam should take this course and join the AP study team.

COURSE: ENGLISH MYTHOLOGY
COURSE NUMBER: 999
A-G: 10 units, Satisfies 11th or 12th grade English
PREREQUISITE: English III
DESCRIPTION: This course is a survey that requires students to read mythological allusions and themes that have stimulated Western civilization thought and literature. Building on the hero and heroine as the embodiment of diverse culture.

COURSE: AMERICAN LITERATURE CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4563
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: American Literature A/B introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres. Students read selected letters, American literature, poetry, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, drama, speeches, novels, nonfiction, technical and informational texts, as well as material that addresses the research process, rhetoric and oral communication, and the Writing Process. Students will also read full-length works like Breaking Through, by Francisco Jiménez. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning projects are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: DIMENSIONS ENGLISH IN CULTURE CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4564
A-G: 10 units, ELECTIVE (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This elective course contains information and activities to support literacy development. The contemporary reading material is designed to be high-interest, relevant, and engaging, giving students the opportunity to experience success in an online environment.

COURSE: ENGLISH I CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4565
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: In conjunction with English 1B, English 1A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students will gain experience with fiction, nonfiction, short stories, drama, historical literature, technical and informational texts, oral communication the Writing Process, grammar and mechanics, and critical thinking and analysis. Students are asked to read and analyze major literary works such as Dance Hall of the Dead by Tony Hillerman and Sunrise Over Fallujah by Walter Dean Meyers. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions and activities are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: ENGLISH II CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4567
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: English I or English I CH
DESCRIPTION: In conjunction with English 2B, English 2A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres. Students read selected short stories, mythology, poetry, historical literature, speeches, folklore/legends, novels, and nonfiction, as well as material that addresses the research process, oral communication, and the Writing Process. Students will also read full-length texts like Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: ENGLISH III CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4568
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: English II
DESCRIPTION: In conjunction with English 3B, English 3A introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres. Students read selected short stories, American literature, poetry, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, drama, speeches, novels, memoir, and nonfiction, as well as material that addresses the research process, oral communication, and the Writing Process. Students will also read full-length texts like The Crucible by Arthur Miller and Parrot in the Oven: mi vida by Victor Martinez. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: ENGLISH IV CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4569
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: English III
DESCRIPTION: English 4 introduces students to various concepts of the study of language and presents strategies that will help students learn how to become successful readers, writers, and thinkers. Students develop their reading, language, analysis, and critical thinking skills through the study of a variety of perspectives and genres. Students read selected letters, American literature, historical literature from a variety of different cultures, nonfiction and informational texts, as well as material that addresses the research process, rhetoric and oral communication, and the Writing Process. Students will also read full-length works like Bless Me, Ultima. Through directed reading and writing, students focus on the mechanics of language, vocabulary development, and evaluate recurring patterns and connections within the literature presented. Students engage in several writing assignments and oral presentations that include narrative, expository, and persuasive essays which demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, and research skills.

COURSE: GRAMMAR THROUGH LITERATURE CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4570
A-G: 10 units, ELECTIVE
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course helps students learn how to build skills in writing. Punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules are presented through applications to demonstrate effective writing that can be easily understood. A variety of literature is used to introduce and practice the grammar topics—fiction and nonfiction. Literature is used to assist in the understanding and application of grammar principles. All units are accompanied by a CD that provides assistance with the correct pronunciation of the words contained within each literature selection. The various skills at each level are introduced through the content of literature selections and then applied through various activities.

COURSE: READING/WRITING CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4571
A-G: 10 units, ELECTIVE
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course helps students develop the language arts skills and strategies necessary to be successful on tests. This course is divided into five units: Unit 1: Reading Standard 1.0—Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary Development; Written and Oral English Language Conventions 1.0; Unit 2: Reading Comprehension 2.0—Focus on Informational Materials Unit 3: Literary Response and Analysis 3.0; Unit 4: Writing 1.0—Writing Strategies; and Unit 5: Writing Applications: 2.0 Genres and Their Characteristics.

COURSE: WRITING COMPOSITION CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4572
A-G: 10 units, ENGLISH (B)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to introduce students to various concepts related to the study of critical reading, writing, and analysis. Students focus on the rhetorical, grammatical, and syntactical patterns of language and the Writing Process, with emphasis placed on how to write with intent and command overpurpose, audience, ethos, and message. Each Unit includes concepts that build upon one another; early Units focus on grammar and mechanics, sentence and paragraph construction, etc., and later Units focus on the rhetorical framework (purpose, audience, ethos, message) and how to utilize it when critically analyzing texts or writing their own. Throughout the course, students practice a variety of different types of structured essay writing and by the end of the course, students demonstrate proficiency in drafting, editing, revising, critical analysis, rhetorical structure, and research skills.

While all courses are offered each year, if student interest does not warrant, courses may be cancelled.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

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COURSE TITLE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
COURSE NUMBER:
A-G: 10 units.
PREREQUISITE: None. This course is only available through independent study. While this course does count for A-G, the second year of required same foreign language is not currently offered in ASL.
DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course to help students begin to acquire proficiency in American Sign Language. An exposure to the deaf and hard of hearing culture will be presented. This is an all technology based course.

COURSE: SPANISH I
COURSE NUMBER: 53
A-G: 10 units.
COURSE PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory level course that will help the students to develop the fundamentals of Spanish: grammar, vocabulary, sentence structure, and common expressions.

COURSE: SPANISH II
COURSE NUMBER: 54
A-G: 10 units.
PREREQUISITE: Spanish I
DESCRIPTION: In this course, students learn a variety of grammar and vocabulary skills that go from irregular to reflexive verbs, and different expressions (such as giving directions or talking about yourself.) Students will also develop a comprehensive understanding of the Spanish speaking world.

COURSE: SPANISH III
COURSE NUMBER: 190
A-G: 10 units.
PREREQUISITE: Spanish II
DESCRIPTION: This is an intermediate level course that develops a thorough understanding of the Spanish grammar and complex sentence structure. Discussions of Hispanic culture through readings, conversations about modern topics, and evaluation of works from famous artists are included in this course.

COURSE: SPANISH IV HONORS
COURSE NUMBER:
A-G COURSE: 10 units, 5.0 scale
COURSE PREREQUISITE: Grade “B” or better in Spanish III
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course covers communication and culture within the Spanish language. Students communicate exclusively in Spanish.

COURSE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4797
A-G COURSE: 10 units
COURSE PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Learning a language other than English can open doors to business and personal interactions that might otherwise remain closed. As an exciting and vibrant means of communication with unique culture and heritage, ASL is recognized as its own language with its own syntax and presentation that may be taken beyond the classroom and applied to many areas of a student’s life, including the work world and personal activities. Designed to present American Sign Language (ASL) essential tools for clear communication and to encourage students to foster relationships with people who use ASL as their first language, this course is not meant to be an interpretation of word-for-word English (called Signed Exact English) but rather a language that is expressed through the hands, face, and body and that is then perceived through the eyes. A visual and gestural language, ASL carries as much information as an oral and aural language, just in a different manner. Each Unit explores a different aspect of American Sign Language, including fingerspelling, basic signs, syntax, and other related elements. The information presented in each Unit is meant to not only increase the language, reading, and content area skills of students but also to encourage students to develop and use their signing skills for communication within their own communities.

While all courses are offered each year, if student interest does not warrant, courses may be cancelled.

HUMANITIES – SOCIAL SCIENCE

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JR. HIGH HUMANITIES

COURSE: WORLD HISTORY 7
COURSE NUMBER: 213
A-G : Not for UC Acceptance
PREREQUISITE: None, This is a 7th grade course
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to cover ancient civilizations and the development thereof. This includes politics, religion, economy, and social traditions. This course covers Europe, the Middle East, West Africa, China, Japan, and the Americas.

COURSE: US HISTORY 8
COURSE NUMBER: 218
A-G : Not for UC Acceptance
PREREQUISITE: History 7, This is an 8th grade course
DESCRIPTION: This class encompasses events from the founding of America, its critical documents that became the foundation of American Democracy and the events that have led to modern day United States. It is designed to give students an understanding of effects and influence the US has in political, religious, economic, and social traditions.

COURSE: US HISTORY 8 HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 104 A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, uses 5.0 scale, This is an 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in prior four quarters of World History 7
DESCRIPTION: Building off of the curricula in US History 8, this course takes a more in depth study of US History and deepens the use of critical thinking. It also includes specialty projects including participation in National History Day.

HIGH SCHOOL HUMANITIES

COURSE: HIGH SCHOOL WORLD HISTORY
COURSE NUMBER: 224 A-G: 10 units, 10th grade course
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course takes a global approach to the study of world history by exploring the interregional connections of global themes that connect our world today. It begins with the rise of democratic thought and then explores political revolutions, Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Totalitarianism, World War I and II and the Cold War. Students will uncover the events to present to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

COURSE: HIGH SCHOOL WORLD HISTORY HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 106
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 10th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in prior 4 quarters of English I
DESCRIPTION: Students combine selective factual knowledge and skills of analysis to examine the nature, causes, and consequences of changes in global frameworks. This course takes a global approach to the study of world history by exploring the inter-regional connections and global themes that connect to the world today. Curriculum includes political revolutions, industrial revolution, imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Totalitarianism, World War I, World War II, the cold war, and present history.

COURSE: HIGH SCHOOL US HISTORY
COURSE NUMBER: 258
A-G: 10 units, 11th grade course
PREREQUISITE: HS World History
DESCRIPTION: US History examines and explores the historic, economic, social and political events that helped shape the US today. Including the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on US democratic ideals. Moving focus to the civil war then moving to present day. Looking at the influences of the past, students can project how the influences can impact the nation’s future.

COURSE: HS US HISTORY HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 103
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 11th grade course
PREREQUISITE: HS World History with an “A” grade for the four prior quarters OR HS World History with a “B” grade + for the 4 prior quarters
DESCRIPTION: In Honors United States History students will learn to master historical and analytic skills, including chronological and spatial thinking, historical research, and historical interpretation. Students will explore and examine the historic, economic, social and political events that helped shape the US. Starting with the review of the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on US democratic ideals. Focus on the civil war era then moving to present day follows. As students understand the influences of the past, they can project how the influences can impact our nation in the future.

COURSE TITLE: GOVERNMENT / ECONOMICS
COURSE NUMBER: 247
A-G: 10 units, 12th grade course
PREREQUISITE: HS US History
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to help students build an understanding of how the world works in present day in the world of both government and economics. Curriculum is a survey of modern day political and economic history using critical thinking to tie history in to present day choices.

COURSE TITLE: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4789
A-G: 5 units, semester course
PREREQUISITE: HS US History or US History CH
DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to the study of American government and democracy. Students will analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, examine the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government, and analyze the relationships among federal, state, and local governments. Students will trace the emergence of the United States as a world power and examine the major social problems and tensions: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; and the relationship of religion and government.

COURSE TITLE: ECONOMICS CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4790
A-G: 5 units, semester course
PREREQUISITE: American Government CH or equivalent
DESCRIPTION: This course provides students with an understanding of fundamental economic concepts and principles. Students will be able to recognize, analyze, and understand economic terms and concepts as well as interpret data and draw conclusions about possible solutions. Major topics within the course include production, supply and demand, economic systems, market types and market equilibrium, economic and business cycles, business structures and organization, monetary and fiscal policy, income and taxes, price index, personal economics, the role of government in the economy, and international trade. Students are required not only to master the essential components of Economics, but also to understand and articulate (in writing, verbally, and visually) about economics in general, the dynamics that drive the marketplace, the outside forces that can stimulate or depress the economy, and the global economic system in which they live. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE TITLE: EARLY CALIFORNIA HISTORY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4791
A-G: 10 credits, ELECTIVES (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Early California History focuses on California from the Native American period through 1850. Because California’s history is rich and varied, old drawings, maps, posters, songs, and photographs are included throughout the course. Literature of the time, including diaries, journals, legends, myths, novels, poetry, and nonfiction accounts help to synthesize the concepts. Early California History covers the following general historical periods in California history: The Native American period; European exploration from the early 1500s-1769; Spanish colonization, 1769-1821; The Mexican period, 1821-1848; The Gold Rush (beginning in 1848); and finally, statehood in 1850.

COURSE TITLE: ETHNIC STUDIES CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4792
A-G: 10 credits, ELECTIVES (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Ethnic Studies is a course designed to give students tools to achieve an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the various cultures of the United States of America. Knowledge about other people and their cultures can lead to a lifelong appreciation for history, art, and literature from around the world. Sensitivity to others’ cultural backgrounds can also aid an individual in a variety of situations, from school to the workplace.

COURSE TITLE: SOCIOLOGY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4793
A-G: 10 credits, HUMANITIES (A)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course provides students with an introduction to Sociology as a scientific approach to understanding culture and society. Students will explore the tools, research and methods used to observe and understand human behavior and various perspectives. Students will discover how sociologists conduct research, their major findings on substantive topics, and will be able to define and apply fundamental concepts in sociology such as norms, sanctions, culture, society, status, role, class, gender, ethnic group, stereotype, discrimination, prejudice, and inequality.

COURSE TITLE: WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND CULTURES CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4795
A-G: 10 units, ELECTIVES (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: PART A: World Geography and Cultures A begins with the fundamentals of geography and the five themes of geography. Students are introduced to the physical geological features of the Earth and the solar system. Weather, climate, and ecosystems are also introduced, as well as more specific concepts related to social culture and various political, environmental, and economic systems. Students then explore the geography, culture, and history of various specific geographical areas including the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. PART B: World Geography and Cultures B is a continuation of World Geography and Cultures A. This course continues on the trajectory covering the geography, culture, and history of South and Southeast Asia, East Asia, the Americas, and Eastern Europe. It also explores globalization and the impact of terrorism, population and poverty, environmental issues, and technology across the world.

COURSE TITLE: UNITED STATES HISTORY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4794
A-G: 10 units, HUMANITIES (A)
PREREQUISITE: HS World History or equivalent
DESCRIPTION: U.S. History A and B is a comprehensive study of the United States, beginning with the first semester that covers the vanishing frontier and the movement westward during the late 1800s to the rise of industry in the twentieth century, World War I, the turbulent twenties, and the Great Depression. In the second semester of the course, students study World War II, postwar America, equality and justice, and searching for new values in changing times and in a changing world. Students trace the change in the cultural demographics of American society, the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. The textbook America’s History, Land of Liberty, Book Two: Since 1865 is required reading for this course. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE TITLE: WORLD HISTORY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4796
A-G: 10 units, HUMANITIES (A)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: World History A and B begins with the study of the foundations of civilization and Western democracy, including concepts related to Judaism, Christianity, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the English Civil War, the American Revolution, the French, Latin American, and Russian Revolutions, the reign of different key monarchs, Napoleon Bonaparte, and various nationalist movements that spread throughout Europe and the resulting changes that took place. The course continues with an exploration of imperialism and provides detailed accounts of World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. It also explores the effects of these major events on various countries in the world, the spread of democracy vs. Communism, nuclear arms, the U.N., the struggle for peace, and the challenges faced by the modern world. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

While all courses are offered each year, if student interest does not warrant, courses may be cancelled.

On both campuses, Encore offers a limited full time independent study program for high school students grades 7 – 12.

For grades 7 – 12, students can opt to build a different kind of high school experience by enrolling in Encore’s limited independent study program. With Encore’s program, the core academic classes can be taken online with a weekly class meeting on campus with an independent study coordinator.

The ENCORE DIFFERENCE when it comes to independent study is that all independent study students are invited to take part in the large variety of events, activities, and productions that happen after school. Whether you want to attend a senior prom or be in a major musical theatre production, at Encore you can take part in these activities as part of the independent study program.

ACADEMIC LIFE

Encore has offered independent study to students full time and part time based on their individual needs. For students wishing to use independent study for credit recovery, Encore can place them into one or two classes of guided study to recover courses for graduation.  These courses are taken on campus during a course block in an online class.

GRADES 7 – 12 FULL TIME INDEPENDENT STUDY -In a world where life can get pretty crazy, sometimes traditional seat time is too difficult for a middle or high school student to commit to. Whether you are a full time working performer, caring for family, or just work better on your timelines, independent study is a viable option for the high school student that can plan their week on their own.

For all full time independent study students, they are given a laptop computer with access to our online curriculum. They will be enrolled full time in academic courses based on the plan toward graduation. They can work at their own pace, but are required to meet at an agreed class meeting time with the Independent Study Coordinator and Teacher every week for two hours.

The online curriculum gives backup research and videos to watch if you need help to get through the units that are assigned from week to week. When you come for your weekly visit with your Independent Study Coordinator/Teacher, you will test in the units that you have completed over the course of the week. You will also schedule time to complete science labs outside of your weekly visit.

Encore offers an A-G approved college admissions graduation SIX YEAR PLAN, where only three courses are required on campus to complete the whole six year plan (Chemistry, Spanish I, and Spanish II).

CAMPUS LIFE

Encore offers one of the largest varieties of programs for teams, special events, and social activities. When you are an Encore student in the Independent study program, you are also open to attend and take part in after school activities that the traditional Encore school students take part in.*

TEAMS – Theatre Troupe, Dance Team, Cheer, Production X, Hippogriffs, Media Team, California Scholastic Federation, National Honor Society, International Thespian Society, World Scholars, Cosplay, Mock Trial, Street Team, Student Council

CAMPUS CLASSES – Associated Student Body, Star Quest child development

SHOW CREATIONS – Big Audition Day and about 8 Productions every year that rehearsal after school and on Saturdays

COMPETITIONS – Inventor’s Competitions, National History Day, Science Fair, Spelling Bee, Academic Decathlon, Black History Month Presentation Competition, Talent Show, and Captain Encore

CAMPUS EVENTS – Homecoming, Prom, Graduation, Mystery Night, Encore Social, Skate Night, Holi Festival, Friday Rallies, Carnival, Winter Festival, School Dances, Encore Chats, Team Rush, College and Career Fairs, College Field Trips, Television Show Tapings, Workshops, Senior Activities, Catalina, Hollywood Horror Nights, Master Classes, Talent Show, Captain Encore, Scotty Awards, and any other fun stuff created.

If you are interested in enrolling in Encore’s Independent Study High School program, visit the high school counselor for enrollment or contact Encore’s Admissions Officer, Steve Dekany at sdekany@officerteam.com. Limited space is available.

* Must be academically, attendance, and behavior eligible. For teams that are auditioned, students must pass the audition to participate.

THE FOLLOWING OUTLINES ENCORE’S SIX YEAR A-G INDEPENDENT STUDY ACADEMIC PROGRAM

independent study.docx

Encore’s Academic / Career Arts Internship Opportunities
Earning the Encore edge includes being able to gain “on the job” style training in one of Encore’s Internship Programs. For high school students grades 10 – 12, students can enter an internship program that can help them understand the inner workings of education careers, counseling / psychology careers, and office careers.

OFFICE INTERNSHIPS – Students that are in grades 10 – 12 can sign up to interview for Encore’s clerical internship program for next school year. This program will give Encore students work experience that can help them secure an entry level clerical position after high school.
● Students will be trained how to work as and office receptionist. After training, students can try their hand at working the main hub on campus as the front desk receptionist. This will help you learn how to answer phones, take messages, and help direct traffic in a busy office. WORK EXPERIENCE: This can help you gain a job as a restaurant host, receptionist, or beginning clerical position in a busy office.
● Students will work in the attendance office to help collect paper attendance from each classroom and then work with compiling non confidential data. WORK EXPERIENCE: This can help you gain a job as a beginning level data collector, receptionist, or beginning clerical position in a busy office. Skills learned here can also help instill management abilities. This job is detail oriented and requires accuracy.

TEACHING INTERNSHIPS – Students that are in grades 10 – 12 can sign up to interview for Encore’s teaching internship program for next school year. This program will five students work experience that can help them get hands on insight into the teaching education world.
● Students will work with data analyst and with the Deans of Academics to help compile reporting in regards to Education standards. This is a good place for people interested in becoming teachers to intern so they can learn about pacing and standards. WORK EXPERIENCE: This can help you gain a job as a beginning level data collector, receptionist, or beginning clerical position in a busy office. Skills learned here can also help instill management abilities.
● Students will work in the main office as a runner, collecting and filling out reports in each classroom regarding state standards covered in each classroom. The information collected from the reporter will be used in District reporting. WORK EXPERIENCE: If you are interested in becoming a teacher or other educator, this position will give you the opportunity to see a variety of teaching methods and give awareness to how to track teaching pacing.
● Students will work in the RTI offices to act as peer tutors for students that are struggling with their academics. Students will be responsible for helping students complete current assignments and work 1 on 1 for remediation for underclassmen. WORK EXPERIENCE: Students that are able to take part as Teen Tutor on campus can build the opportunities to help students tutor after high school. This is a great way for students planning to become educators get their feet wet in the process while helping fellow students with their homework.

COUNSELING INTERNSHIPS – Students will go through a summer training program to prepare to be able to help fellow students in the counseling department. Learn how to help be a better friend and help the campuses build peer groups and programs like “No Child Eats Alone.” WORK EXPERIENCE: Students that are able to take part as a peer mentor get the opportunity to work in the counseling department to get hands on experience and insight into the world of psychology and counseling. Students completing summer boot camp can earn recognition as a peer counselor.

MATH

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JUNIOR HIGH MATH

COURSE: MATH 7
COURSE NUMBER: 2007
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 7th grade course
COURSE PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course includes understanding and applying proportional relationships, understanding rational numbers, working with expressions and linear equations, solving problems using scale drawing and information geometric constructions, using 2D and 3D shapes for area, surface, and volume.

COURSE: MATH 8
COURSE NUMBER: 2008
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Math 7
DESCRIPTION: This is an intermediate algebra course. Students learn to reason symbolically. Key content involves writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations and two unknowns. Study of monomial and polynomial expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratio and proportion are covered in this course.

COURSE: MATH 8 HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 20081
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, uses 5.0 scale, 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in the four prior quarters of Math 7
DESCRIPTION: This course is an intermediate algebra course building from the concepts from Math 8. Honors curriculum uses deeper critical thinking, employs extended practice of concepts, and cover material at a faster pace.

HIGH SCHOOL MATH

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH I
COURSE NUMBER: 2001
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Math 8
DESCRIPTION: Topics include recognizing and developing patterns using tables, graphs, and equations. Mathematical modeling is stressed as methodology for approaching the solution to problems. Exploration of algebraic expressions, problem solving using equations, and investigating linear relationships are also covered. Geometry is part of Integrated Math I including area, perimeter, Pythagorean theorem, and geometric proportions. Mathematical probability is provided to reinforce use of fractions and numeric modeling. Technology is used to introduce and expand the areas of study.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH I HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 20011
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale
COURSE PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in the four prior quarters of Math 8 or at least a “B” grade in the four prior quarters of Math 8 Honors
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Building from the curriculum from Integrated Math I, students take a more in depth look at Integrated Math. This course includes additional practice for concepts and include an annual project with EAS.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH II
COURSE NUMBER: 2002
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Math I
DESCRIPTION: This course includes an analytical approach to geometry concepts. Topics include patterns using tables, graphs, and equations. How to predict a formula with proof and geometric properties of both two and three dimensions as they apply to points, levels, planes, circles, and polygons. Focus on transformations and right triangle trigonometry through investigative and explorative activities is covered using explorative activities.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH II HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 20021
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in the four prior quarters of Math I or at least a “B” grade in the four prior quarters of Math I Honors
DESCRIPTION: Building from the curriculum concepts from Integrated Math II, this course offers more in depth critical thinking with additional practice. Students wishing to take the AP exam for advanced math should enroll in this course and sign up for the AP study team.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH III
COURSE NUMBER: 2003
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Math II
DESCRIPTION: Expands on the concepts covered in Integrated Math I and Integrated Math II. Algebraic solutions as used in systems of quadratic equations, logarithms, exponential functions, statistics, and trigonomic functions are covered.

COURSE: PRE-CALCULUS HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 241
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale
PREREQUISITE: At least a “B” grade in either Math III or “C” in Math III Honors
DESCRIPTION: Students develop reasoning and problem solving skills as they study functions, graphs, trigonometry, polar coordinates, conic exponential functions, logarithmic functions, discrete math, and the introduction of calculus.

COURSE: CALCULUS HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 2071
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale
PREREQUISITE: At least a “C” in Pre-Calculus Honors
DESCRIPTION: Calculus is a transition course to upper-division mathematics and computer science courses. Students will extend their experience with functions as they study the fundamental concepts of calculus: limiting behaviors, difference quotients and the derivative, Riemann sums and the definite integral, antiderivatives and indefinite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students review and extend their knowledge of trigonometry and basic analytic geometry. Important objectives of the calculus sequence are to develop and strengthen the students’ problem-solving skills and to teach them to read, write, speak, and think in the language of mathematics. In particular, students learn how to apply the tools of calculus to a variety of problem situations.

COURSE: STATISTICS HONORS
COURSE NUMBER:1111
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale
PREREQUISITE: At least a “C” Math III
DESCRIPTION: Statistics and Probability offers students an alternative to Precalculus as a fourth high school mathematics course. In the Statistics and Probability course, students continue to develop a more formal and precise understanding of statistical inference, which requires a deeper understanding of probability. Students learn that formal inference procedures are designed for studies in which the sampling or assignment of treatments was random, and these procedures may be less applicable to non-randomized observational studies. Probability is still viewed as long-run relative frequency, but the emphasis now shifts to conditional probability and independence, and basic rules for calculating probabilities of compound events. In the plus (+) standards are the Multiplication Rule, probability distributions, and their expected values. Probability is presented as an essential tool for decision making in a world of uncertainty.

COURSE: STRATEGIC MATHEMATICS
COURSE NUMBER: 20181 (HS) 20182 (JR)
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course is intended to create strategic mathematical learners from underprepared mathematics students. The basic understandings will stimulate students to think about their approach to mathematical learning. These basic understandings will include identifying errors in the teaching and learning process, input errors, physiological concerns, and key cognitive skills. The essential knowledge and skills will foster a deeper understanding of the task of learning mathematical concepts.

COURSE: ALGEBRA I CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4777
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Pre Algebra CH or equivalent
DESCRIPTION: In conjunction with Algebra B, this course shows how algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations and, in seeing the larger picture and in understanding the underlying concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to new situations and problems. Students review Pre-Algebra skills (including variables, expressions, order of operations, and equations) and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. As students progress through the course, they will study concepts like sequences and their graphs, independent and dependent relationships, how to simplify and solve equations and functions, monomials and polynomials, factorization, exponential graphs and functions, transformations, slope, how to solve systems, square roots, quadratic equations, inequalities, absolute value, statistics, etc. Much of the course covers abstract relationships and their manipulations, but it also involves algebraic thinking and the application of these skills to word problems and real life situations. Students have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independence which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: ALGEBRA II CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4778
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Algebra I CH or equivalent
DESCRIPTION: In Algebra 2A and 2B, students build on mathematical concepts learned in Algebra and Geometry by extending their knowledge through the study of functions (polynomial, rational, radical, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic), systems of equations and inequalities, modeling (linear, quadratic, and exponential), trigonometric functions, and probability and statistics. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students work with the concepts in various applications including practice exercises, solving word problems, and working with real-world situations, and they have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Activities and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: APPLICATIONS MATH CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4779
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: PART A: Application Math A is a California State and Common Core standards-based course that helps students develop mathematical computational and procedural skills. Concepts covered in the course include: operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; using proportion, ratio, and percent; measurements in both U.S. and metric systems; and using mathematical reasoning to solve various types of word problems and applications. PART B: Application Math B is a standards-based course that continues to build on concepts presented in Application Math A. This course helps students develop mathematical computational and procedural skills. Concepts covered in the course include: statistics and probability, algebraic equations, geometry fundamentals, and using mathematical reasoning to solve various types of problems.

COURSE: BASIC MATH CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4780
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Essential math skills, including the numeration system, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and their application in daily life situations are covered. Basic Math is designed to teach students basic mathematical concepts including fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, ratio, proportion, percent, and measurement. Concepts presented address foundational skills for future mathematical studies. This course helps students develop a concrete understanding of the mathematical concepts necessary to prepare for the math portion of testing.

COURSE: CONSUMER MATH CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4781
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: The course is designed to address and build upon basic mathematical concepts that are applicable to real-world consumer situations such as banking, finance, investments, housing, insurance, budgeting, employment, compensation, taxes, and starting and operating a small business. Upon completion, students will be familiar with consumerism, their role as consumers in today’s economy, and fundamental principles of economics related to personal and household finances.

COURSE: CONSUMER MATH CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4781
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: The course is designed to address and build upon basic mathematical concepts that are applicable to real-world consumer situations such as banking, finance, investments, housing, insurance, budgeting, employment, compensation, taxes, and starting and operating a small business. Upon completion, students will be familiar with consumerism, their role as consumers in today’s economy, and fundamental principles of economics related to personal and household finances.

COURSE: GEOMETRY CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4782
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Algebra I
DESCRIPTION: In Geometry A and B, geometric skills are applied to a wide variety of problem-solving situations and, in seeing the larger picture and in understanding the underlying concepts, students will be in a better position to apply their knowledge to new situations and problems. Students begin by studying the basic essentials of geometry including points, lines, planes, angles, segments, geometric figures, patterns, logic, and reasoning. As students progress through the course, they will study concepts like parallel and perpendicular properties, coordinate geometry, translations and constructions, triangles, congruency and similarity, reflections and symmetry, ratios and proportions, trigonometry, sine and cosine, polygons, proofs, circles, perimeter, area, volume, etc. Students also cover a variety of statistical concepts and applications. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes in a collaborative environment and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, think critically, develop logical thought processes, and make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process. Questions, activities, and performance-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH I CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4783
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Both semesters of Integrated Math 1 introduce concepts related to: function families, graphing linear and nonlinear functions, and exponential functions; simplifying, evaluating, and solving equations and systems; algebraic properties; and geometric concepts like angle measures, triangles, circles, constructions, congruency, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, etc.; and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. Students will engage in the content through reading of material, a plethora of examples and opportunities for practice, and utilize technology and online resources successfully and strategically and demonstrate their understanding through problem solving practice, project-based/performance task analysis, writing assignments, interactive activities, and a variety of self and summative assessments. They also utilize technology and online resources successfully and strategically so they can produce written and digital texts that demonstrate their understanding of the concepts presented in the course.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH II CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4784
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Integrated Math I CH
DESCRIPTION: In both semesters of Integrated Math 2, students will gain experience with geometric and algebraic solutions to problems in various content areas including: properties of polygons, trigonometry, circles, area and perimeter, proofs, dilations, similarity, ratios, surface area and volume, polynomials, quadratic functions, and radicals, as well as statistical concepts related to probability, data distribution, linear regression, and the fundamentals of the language of mathematics. Students will engage in the content through reading material, a plethora of examples and opportunities for practice, and the utilization of technology and online resources successfully and strategically. Students demonstrate their understanding through problem solving practice, project-based/performance task analysis, writing assignments, interactive activities, and a variety of self and summative assessments.

COURSE: INTEGRATED MATH III CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4785
A-G: 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Integrated Math II CH
DESCRIPTION: Integrated Math 3, students build on mathematical concepts learned in Integrated Math 1 and 2 by extending their knowledge through the study of functions and graphs, systems of equations and inequalities, polynomial functions, rational expressions and equations, radical functions, and imaginary and complex numbers. Problems are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course. Students work with the concepts in various ways including practice exercises, word problems, and performance tasks, and they have the opportunity to develop and utilize analytical skills, to think critically, to develop logical thought processes, to use technology and online resources strategically, and to make valid inferences. The plan of instruction includes demonstration, modeling, guided practice, and independent application which will lead students to broaden their scope of the problem-solving process.

COURSE: MATH SKILLS CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4786
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course is aligned with the California State Mathematics Standards and Frameworks and the five strands adopted by the State Board of Education: Statistics and Data Analysis, Number Sense, Algebra and Functions, Mathematical Reasoning and Measurement, and Geometry. Proficiency in the California Mathematics Standards covered in the course will help students acquire rudimentary math skills and sharpen critical thinking skills.

COURSE: PRE ALGEBRA CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4786
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course serves as a precursor to Algebra A. Calculator activities are provided to stimulate student interest and to facilitate the introduction of math concepts including whole numbers, properties and rules of operations, number theory, rational numbers, ratio, proportion, percentage, measurement, statistics and probability, real numbers, and graphing. Students will also study basic algebra principles such as algebraic expressions, polynomials, equations, and factoring.

While all courses are offered each year, if student interest does not warrant, courses may be cancelled.

As part of the Physical Education Graduation requirements in the state of California, Encore students must complete a total of twenty (20) Physical Education units during the six year plan. A lot of performing arts classes that are offered by Encore are used to satisfy the PE requirement. This list includes all of the PE courses offered for the 2018/2019 school year.

COURSE: HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
COURSE NUMBER: 230
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: Grades 9-12
DESCRIPTION: Recreational Basketball will be involved in many activities to help them improve dribbling, shooting, defense, and teamwork. An emphasis will be placed on the teaching of skills basketball so that students can participate effectively. Agility drills will be used throughout the year to help students gain coordination.

COURSE: JR BASKETBALL
COURSE NUMBER: 6001
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: Grades 7-8
DESCRIPTION: Recreational Basketball will be involved in many activities to help them improve dribbling, shooting, defense, and teamwork. An emphasis will be placed on the teaching of skills basketball so that students can participate effectively. Agility drills will be used throughout the year to help students gain coordination

COURSE: BEGINNING ARCHERY
COURSE NUMBER: 6000
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: Grades 9 – 12
DESCRIPTION: The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition. … Basic equipment used for archery will be provided.

COURSE: FITNESS WALKING
COURSE NUMBER: 6002
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this course is to increase cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. By the end of the year, the student will demonstrate and understand how to take their heart rate and access cardio-respiratory intensity level, demonstrate the ability to stretch and warm up properly prior to exercise, calculate their personal target heart rate zone, demonstrate the ability to fitness walk a specific amount of time and/or distance that increases as the class progresses, explain the benefits of walking as a form of exercise. Students will go on instructor guided walks off campus. Students must provide appropriate walking shoes.

COURSE: FITNESS JOGGING
COURSE NUMBER: 6003
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Fitness and Recreational Activity Walking & Jogging, Fitness development with on emphasis on walking, jogging, and running, including discussion of proper technique and health benefits. Students will go on instructor guided jogs and walks off campus. Students must provide appropriate running shoes.

COURSE: CIRQUE CONDITIONING
COURSE NUMBER: 2161
A-G: 10 credits, Elective
HOUSES: Performing Arts, Music Arts, Visual & Technical Arts, Career Arts
CONSERVATORY: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course is beginning hands on strength training to prepare students to enter the cirque conservatory. Students will execute extensive flexibility training in this class. 90% of this course is about gaining strength and flexibility for the safety of going into the cirque conservatory and 10% of this course explores cirque apparatus.

Many arts courses count toward physical education credit. The following is an inclusive list of conservatory courses that count for PE credit in the 2018 / 2019 school year:
Drama I, Dance Technique, Cirque Conditioning, Acting I, Acting II, Acting III, Advanced Choreography, Ballet & Lyrical II, Ballet & Lyrical III, Ballet & Lyrical IV, Ballet I, Beginning Choreography, Circus Arts I, Circus Arts II, Circus Arts III, Circus Dance, Cirque Choreography, Cirque Conditioning, Dance Team, Dance Technique, Drama I, Drumline, Ground Arts I, Ground Arts II, Hip Hop, Hippogriffs, Jazz I Dance, Jazz & Tap II, Jazz & Tap III, Jazz & Tap IV, Men’s Ballet, Men’s Dance, Musical Theatre I, Musical Theatre II, Musical Theatre III, Pointe I, Pointe II, Professional Vocalist, Rhythm & Combo, Production X, Stage Tech, Street Team, Star Quest, Theatre Troupe, Tumbling I, Tumbling II, Tumbling III, Voice Technique I, Voice Technique II, and Voice Technique III.

SCIENCE

Click the picture below for enlarged view

JUNIOR HIGH SCIENCE

COURSE: INTEGRATED SCIENCE 7
COURSE NUMBER: 212
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 7th grade course
PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTBOOK: Integrated Science Course, CK12 Flexbook: 2015 – Expires 2021
DESCRIPTION: As an introduction to the life sciences, Science 7 covers molecules to organisms – structures and process, ecosystems – interactions and energy, heredity, and biological evolution.
ONLINE RESOURCES AVAILABLE AT: http://ck12.org

COURSE: INTEGRATED SCIENCE 8
COURSE NUMBER: 217
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Science 7
TEXTBOOK: Integrated Science Course, CK12 Flexbook: 2015 – Expires 2021
DESCRIPTION: Organized around the California Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), students explore science in a variety of learning activities including hands-on lab experiments and activities. The course covers motion, force, electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, earth’s energy, evolution, and the solar system.
ONLINE RESOURCES AVAILABLE: http://ck12.org

COURSE: INTEGRATED SCIENCE 8 HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 148
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 5.0 SCALE, 8th grade course
COURSE PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four quarters of Science 7
TEXTBOOK: Integrated Science Course, CK12 Flexbook: 2015 – Expires 2021
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This class establishes and expands fundamental skills and concepts in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students develop reading fluency and depth with a selection of short stories, novels, and essays. There is a focus on clear and effective writing and speaking through word choice and organization of thoughts in a variety of essays, speeches, presentations, and collaborative work.
ONLINE RESOURCES AVAILABLE: http://ck12.org

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE

COURSE: BIOLOGY
COURSE NUMBER: 221
A-G: 10 units (D: Lab Science)
PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTBOOK: Biology, CK12 Flexbook: 2012 – expires 2018
DESCRIPTION: Biology is the in depth study of the life sciences including particular, organic chemistry, microbiology, cytology, genetics, biogenetics, evolution, comparative anatomy among zoology, botany, and human biology, ecology, and it effect on biodiversity. Emphasis is on investigation analysis, and critical thinking. This class covers multiple labs including dissections.
ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES: http://ck12.org

COURSE: BIOLOGY HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 2211
A-G: 10 units. 5.0 scale (D: Lab Science)
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four quarters of Science 8
TEXTBOOK: Biology, CK12 Flexbook: 2012 – expires 2018
DESCRIPTION: Building on the concepts of Encore’s Biology curriculum, this course analyzes and requires advanced critical thinking to complete Biology tasks. Students wishing to take the AP exam in Biology should enroll in this course and sign up for the AP study team.
ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES: http://ck12.org

COURSE: ANATOMY HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 1532
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale (D: Lab Science)
PREREQUISITE: Biology with a grade “C” or better
TEXTBOOK: Hole’s Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 12th edition: 2014.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course covers the relationships between functions and structures of the human body. This is a lab based science course that covers the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within the human body.
WANT TO BUY A TEXTBOOK? – ISBN: 73403725.  (This is not necessary, but some students prefer to have a copy to keep at home.  Encore provides a copy on the issued laptop.)

COURSE: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
COURSE NUMBER: 1555
A-G: 10 units (D – Lab Science)
PREREQUISITE: Biology
DESCRIPTION: This course shows scientific concepts within a variety of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, and physics. The goal of this course is to expose students to the environmental challenges of today and to cultivate scientific critical thinking skills.

COURSE: CHEMISTRY
COURSE NUMBER: 155
A-G: 10 units (D: Lab Science)
PREREQUISITE: Biology
TEXTBOOK: Chemistry, CK12 Flexbook: 2014 – expires 2021
DESCRIPTION: The science of structure, composition, and properties of all matter. The emphasis is on critical thinking, scientific investigation, and data analysis through lab activities, model building, and research.
ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES: http://ck12.org

COURSE: CHEMISTRY HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 154
A-G: 10 units. 5.0 scale (D: Lab Science)
COURSE PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” for the four quarters of Math I or at least a “B” grade for the four quarter of Math I Honors
TEXTBOOK: Chemistry, CK12 Flexbook: 2014 – expires 2021
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Building on the foundation of Encore’s Chemistry course, this course has a more advanced pace for curriculum and extended projects. For students wishing to take the AP exam for Chemistry, they should enroll in this course and sign up for the AP study team.
ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES: http://ck12.org

COURSE: LABORATORY BIOLOGY CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)COURSE NUMBER: 4557A-G: 10 units. COURSE PREREQUISITE: NoneCOURSE DESCRIPTION: Laboratory Biology A and B is correlated directly with both the Next Generation Science Standards and the California State Content Standards. This course requires students to work in an online setting for 80% of the course and, in order to support concepts covered there, to also perform hands-on experiments supervised by an instructor in a physical laboratory setting at the school site for the remaining 20%. Guidelines for all lab activities are contained within Cyber High and they count as 20% of the student’s final course grade. This course introduces students to concepts related to cells and cancer; cellular energy including respiration and photosynthesis; the pivotal role of ATP in energy transfer; Mendelian genetics; molecular genetics, including DNA analysis, DNA fingerprinting, and recombinant DNA; biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and enzymes and the factors that affect their activity; the immune system, infectious diseases, and pathogens; the human nervous system, endocrine systems; reproduction in plants and animals; the domains and kingdoms of life and the Linnaean classification system; the evolution of life; and ecology. Students will demonstrate their understanding through lab experiments, writing assignments, interactive activities, projects, and a variety of self-graded and summative assessments.

COURSE: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4555
A-G: 10 None
COURSE PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course teaches the student how organisms interact with the environment, and with each other, and how they adapt to fit into their environmental niche. This course teaches students about the human effect on the environment, the consequences of population growth, and the effect of toxic wastes. Survival skills are also included.

COURSE: INTEGRATED SCIENCE I CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4556
A-G: None
COURSE PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts, principles and methods of science by using an integrated approach. It provides information and practice in the following areas of Integrated Science: cells, the basic building blocks of life, systems that produce a functioning organism, Newton’s Laws of Motion, weather, climate, the Earth’s atmosphere and biomes. This Integrated Science course exposes students to concepts in chemistry, physics, Earth science and biology. Some of the major topics presented in this course include cell function and cell reproduction, the movement of the Earth’s crust, earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, geologic time, the structure of atoms, the periodic table of elements and the bonding of atoms to form molecules, electricity, magnetism and the electromagnetic spectrum. Students also study the natural history of California and are exposed to concepts relating to chemistry, physics, Earth science, and biology.

COURSE: PHYSICAL SCIENCE CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4558
A-G: None
COURSE PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students study fundamental concepts related to light, energy, electricity, sound, and pressure, and demonstrate their understanding through various activities that encourage critical thinking and analysis, journal entries, and writing assignments. All units include small experiments and longer investigations requiring formal lab reports. Students study fundamental concepts related to matter, elements, mixtures, chemical reactions, motion, and technology, and demonstrate their understanding through activities that encourage critical thinking and analysis, journal entries, and writing assignments. All Units include small experiments and longer investigations requiring formal lab reports.

While all courses are offered each year, if student interest does not warrant, courses may be cancelled.

SKILLS CLASSES

COURSE: STUDY SKILLS 7
COURSE NUMBER: 2397
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance
PREREQUISITE: None, Requisite in 7th grade at Encore
DESCRIPTION: This essential Study Skills course will help develop and strengthen academic and organizational skills, while encouraging each student to focus more on overall personal well-being. Valuable strategies for success in academic and elective courses in addition to developing daily study habits to help students become successful and healthy for individual lifelong learning is covered.

COURSE: LIFE SKILLS 8
COURSE NUMBER: 9011
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance
PREREQUISITE: None, Requisite in 8th grade at Encore
DESCRIPTION: This course covers skills that need to be acquired to be a successful human being. Covering health, typing, bullies, math fundamentals, nutrition, and budgets – this course helps students prepare for life.

COURSE: STRATEGIC MATHEMATICS (Jr. High)
COURSE NUMBER: 20182 (JR)
A-G: NonePREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to help students that could use extra help in mathematics mastering fundamentals and working on grade level math. This course focuses on helping students complete fundamentals, give extra time with guided practice on their current math homework, and prepare them for PSAT and CAASPP testing in the areas of math. This course is requisite for any student that earns a “C” or lower in math class OR does not meet standards on annual tests.

COURSE: STRATEGIC MATHEMATICS (High School)
COURSE NUMBER: 20181 (HS)
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to help students that could use extra help in mathematics mastering fundamentals and working on grade level math. This course focuses on helping students complete fundamentals, give extra time with guided practice on their current math homework, and prepare them for PSAT, SAT, and CAASPP testing in the areas of math. This course is requisite for any student that earns a “C” or lower in math I or II class OR does not meet standards on annual tests.

COURSE: STRATEGIC LANGUAGE ARTS (Junior High)
COURSE NUMBER: 211
A-G: None
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course if designed to help students that could use extra help in language arts mastering fundamentals and working through grade level language skills. This course focuses on helping students complete fundamentals, give extra time with guided practice on their current ELA homework, and prepare them for PSAT, and CAASPP testing in the areas of language arts. This course is requisited for any student that earns a “D” or lower in English class OR does not meet standards on annual tests.

COURSE: STRATEGIC ENGLISH (High School)
COURSE NUMBER: 2112
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course if designed to help students that could use extra help in English mastering fundamentals and working through grade level language skills. This course focuses on helping students complete fundamentals, give extra time with guided practice on their current English homework, and prepare them for PSAT, SAT, and CAASPP testing in the area of English. This course is requisite for any student that earns a “D” or lower in English class OR does not meet standards on annual tests.

COURSE: STUDY HALL (Jr. High)
COURSE NUMBER: 10
PREREQUISITE: MUST BE IN JUNIOR HIGH
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed as a silent study time for students to work and complete homework during class time. They will be required to work independently and will be required to complete test prep bell work for each class period.

COURSE: STUDY HALL (High School)
COURSE NUMBER: 1012
PREREQUISITE: GRADES 9 – 12
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed as a silent study time for students to work and complete homework during classtime. They will be required to work independently and will be required to complete test prep bellwork for each class period.

COURSE: STRATEGY SKILLS (Jr. High)
COURSE NUMBER: 3000
PREREQUISITE: REFERRAL
DESCRIPTION: This course is assigned for specific small group strategies to help students succeed. They work with assigned teachers to help them learn how to accomplish tasks within their general education classes.

COURSE: STRATEGY SKILLS (High School)
COURSE NUMBER: 3001
PREREQUISITE: REFERRAL
DESCRIPTION: This course is assigned for specific small group strategies to help students succeed. They work with assigned teachers to help them learn how to accomplish tasks within their general education classes.

COURSE: STEM PROJECT SKILLS 
COURSE NUMBER: 2399
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 10 units
PREREQUISITE: Grades 9 – 12
DESCRIPTION: This course works through projects to reinforce math, science, and grammar. Students learn to work both independently and in groups to become task oriented. This course uses a sequence of projects based in STEM education (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math).

COURSE: HS COLLEGE SKILLS
COURSE NUMBER:
A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, 10 units
PREREQUISITE: None. Open to grades 11 – 12
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to walk students through how to select the correct college for after high school success and how to maneuver everything needed to get in and go to college. This course covers everything from student aid, scholarships, SAT, and how to choose a college path.

1 to 1 Chromebook Program

For the convenience of our students and parents the Student Technology Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) can now be downloaded from the EncoreHighschool.com website then printed, completed and returned. Students and Parents must sign and return the contract before a Chromebooks will be issued. Chromebooks are required to access Cyberhigh and our digital textbooks. Precautions and filters have been put in place to keep Internet access family friendly.
 
CLICK HERE to down the contract.
Riverside Contracts are then returned to the following teachers.
 
Mr. Dutcher.
Ms. White.
Ms. Mayyas.
Or Ms. Valerie at 3rd floor reception.
 
Hesperia Contracts are then returned to the following teachers.
Ms. McCue.
Mr. Wise.
Ms. Quinn.
Mr. Parker
Or Ms. Ashley at G building reception.

WHAT CLASSES DO I NEED TO TAKE?

Encore will guide you on how to correctly choose your classes to get the best, personalized education that you can. This chart covers the academic courses you will need to take to complete Encore’s six year academic plan. Each semester, most courses are worth 5 units. There are two compulsory semesters each year. Summer school is not required unless you are making up classes.  Click the picture below to see it in more detail.

The high school years at Encore are a journey to prepare students for college, career, and life.  There are a variety of opportunities for academic, artistic, and professional growth.  Encore’s high school program is created on a four year track  Students wishing to complete high school early should meet with counseling early (9th grade) to appropriately plan for an early graduation.  If students are on a professional artist track that may require times of extended leave and independent study, students should make an appointment with counseling.

Encore has adopted the University of California admissions requirements as the graduation requirements for Encore.  All students will be enrolled in courses that satisfy California university admissions requirements (A-G requirements).  If your student does not plan on attending a CSU or UC after high school, they should research admissions requirements to make sure that they will have completed the appropriate courses for admission to the university of choice.  While A-G is the most common worldwide, this is not an exact admissions requirement for every college.

Only students that pass the classes with a “C” or better will qualify as completed A-G courses.  Students scoring less than a “C” will be put on a path to retake or makeup the course before or during their senior year.

All high school students are required at minimum to complete the A-G course requirements by graduation.