Humanities

HUMANITIES – SOCIAL SCIENCE

JR. HIGH HUMANITIES

COURSE: WORLD HISTORY 7 
COURSE NUMBER: 213
A-G : Not for UC Acceptance
PREREQUISITE: None, This is a 7th grade course
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to cover ancient civilizations and the development thereof. This includes politics, religion, economy, and social traditions. This course covers Europe, the Middle East, West Africa, China, Japan, and the Americas.

COURSE: US HISTORY 8 
COURSE NUMBER: 218
A-G : Not for UC Acceptance
PREREQUISITE: History 7, This is an 8th grade course
DESCRIPTION: This class encompasses events from the founding of America, its critical documents that became the foundation of American Democracy and the events that have led to modern day United States. It is designed to give students an understanding of effects and influence the US has in political, religious, economic, and social traditions.

COURSE: US HISTORY 8 HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 104 A-G: Not for UC Acceptance, uses 5.0 scale, This is an 8th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in prior four quarters of World History 7
DESCRIPTION: Building off of the curricula in US History 8, this course takes a more in depth study of US History and deepens the use of critical thinking. It also includes specialty projects including participation in National History Day.

HIGH SCHOOL HUMANITIES

COURSE: WORLD HISTORY / GEOGRAPHY / CULTURES
COURSE NUMBER: 224 A-G: 10 units, 10th grade course
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course takes a global approach to the study of world history by exploring the interregional connections of global themes that connect our world today. It begins with the rise of democratic thought and then explores political revolutions, Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Totalitarianism, World War I and II and the Cold War. Students will uncover the events to present to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives.

COURSE: HIGH SCHOOL WORLD HISTORY HONORS 
COURSE NUMBER: 106
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 10th grade course
PREREQUISITE: Grade “A” in prior 4 quarters of English I
DESCRIPTION: Students combine selective factual knowledge and skills of analysis to examine the nature, causes, and consequences of changes in global frameworks. This course takes a global approach to the study of world history by exploring the inter-regional connections and global themes that connect to the world today. Curriculum includes political revolutions, industrial revolution, imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Totalitarianism, World War I, World War II, the cold war, and present history.

COURSE: HIGH SCHOOL US HISTORY
COURSE NUMBER: 258
A-G: 10 units, 11th grade course
PREREQUISITE: HS World History
DESCRIPTION: US History examines and explores the historic, economic, social and political events that helped shape the US today. Including the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on US democratic ideals. Moving focus to the civil war then moving to present day. Looking at the influences of the past, students can project how the influences can impact the nation’s future.

COURSE: HS US HISTORY HONORS
COURSE NUMBER: 103
A-G: 10 units, 5.0 scale, 11th grade course
PREREQUISITE: HS World History with an “A” grade for the four prior quarters OR HS World History with a “B” grade + for the 4 prior quarters
DESCRIPTION: In Honors United States History students will learn to master historical and analytic skills, including chronological and spatial thinking, historical research, and historical interpretation. Students will explore and examine the historic, economic, social and political events that helped shape the US. Starting with the review of the nation’s beginnings and the impact of the Enlightenment on US democratic ideals. Focus on the civil war era then moving to present day follows. As students understand the influences of the past, they can project how the influences can impact our nation in the future.

COURSE TITLE: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND ECONOMICS
COURSE NUMBER: 247
A-G: 10 units, 12th grade course
PREREQUISITE: HS US History
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to help students build an understanding of how the world works in present day in the world of both government and economics. Curriculum is a survey of modern day political and economic history using critical thinking to tie history in to present day choices.

COURSE TITLE: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CH(INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4789
A-G: 5 units, semester course
PREREQUISITE: HS US History or US History CH
DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to the study of American government and democracy. Students will analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, examine the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government, and analyze the relationships among federal, state, and local governments. Students will trace the emergence of the United States as a world power and examine the major social problems and tensions: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; and the relationship of religion and government.

COURSE TITLE: ECONOMICS CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4790
A-G: 5 units, semester course
PREREQUISITE: American Government CH or equivalent
DESCRIPTION: This course provides students with an understanding of fundamental economic concepts and principles. Students will be able to recognize, analyze, and understand economic terms and concepts as well as interpret data and draw conclusions about possible solutions. Major topics within the course include production, supply and demand, economic systems, market types and market equilibrium, economic and business cycles, business structures and organization, monetary and fiscal policy, income and taxes, price index, personal economics, the role of government in the economy, and international trade. Students are required not only to master the essential components of Economics, but also to understand and articulate (in writing, verbally, and visually) about economics in general, the dynamics that drive the marketplace, the outside forces that can stimulate or depress the economy, and the global economic system in which they live. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE TITLE: EARLY CALIFORNIA HISTORY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4791
A-G: 10 credits, ELECTIVES (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Early California History focuses on California from the Native American period through 1850. Because California’s history is rich and varied, old drawings, maps, posters, songs, and photographs are included throughout the course. Literature of the time, including diaries, journals, legends, myths, novels, poetry, and nonfiction accounts help to synthesize the concepts. Early California History covers the following general historical periods in California history: The Native American period; European exploration from the early 1500s-1769; Spanish colonization, 1769-1821; The Mexican period, 1821-1848; The Gold Rush (beginning in 1848); and finally, statehood in 1850.

COURSE TITLE: ETHNIC STUDIES CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4792
A-G: 10 credits, ELECTIVES (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: Ethnic Studies is a course designed to give students tools to achieve an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the various cultures of the United States of America. Knowledge about other people and their cultures can lead to a lifelong appreciation for history, art, and literature from around the world. Sensitivity to others’ cultural backgrounds can also aid an individual in a variety of situations, from school to the workplace.

COURSE TITLE: SOCIOLOGY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4793
A-G: 10 credits, HUMANITIES (A)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: This course provides students with an introduction to Sociology as a scientific approach to understanding culture and society. Students will explore the tools, research and methods used to observe and understand human behavior and various perspectives. Students will discover how sociologists conduct research, their major findings on substantive topics, and will be able to define and apply fundamental concepts in sociology such as norms, sanctions, culture, society, status, role, class, gender, ethnic group, stereotype, discrimination, prejudice, and inequality.

COURSE TITLE: WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND CULTURES CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4795
A-G: 10 units, ELECTIVES (G)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: PART A: World Geography and Cultures A begins with the fundamentals of geography and the five themes of geography. Students are introduced to the physical geological features of the Earth and the solar system. Weather, climate, and ecosystems are also introduced, as well as more specific concepts related to social culture and various political, environmental, and economic systems. Students then explore the geography, culture, and history of various specific geographical areas including the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. PART B: World Geography and Cultures B is a continuation of World Geography and Cultures A. This course continues on the trajectory covering the geography, culture, and history of South and Southeast Asia, East Asia, the Americas, and Eastern Europe. It also explores globalization and the impact of terrorism, population and poverty, environmental issues, and technology across the world.

COURSE TITLE: UNITED STATES HISTORY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4794
A-G: 10 units, HUMANITIES (A)
PREREQUISITE: HS World History or equivalent
DESCRIPTION: U.S. History A and B is a comprehensive study of the United States, beginning with the first semester that covers the vanishing frontier and the movement westward during the late 1800s to the rise of industry in the twentieth century, World War I, the turbulent twenties, and the Great Depression. In the second semester of the course, students study World War II, postwar America, equality and justice, and searching for new values in changing times and in a changing world. Students trace the change in the cultural demographics of American society, the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women, and the role of the United States as a major world power. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. The textbook America’s History, Land of Liberty, Book Two: Since 1865 is required reading for this course. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

COURSE TITLE: WORLD HISTORY CH (INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE)
COURSE NUMBER: 4796
A-G: 10 units, HUMANITIES (A)
PREREQUISITE: None
DESCRIPTION: World History A and B begins with the study of the foundations of civilization and Western democracy, including concepts related to Judaism, Christianity, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the English Civil War, the American Revolution, the French, Latin American, and Russian Revolutions, the reign of different key monarchs, Napoleon Bonaparte, and various nationalist movements that spread throughout Europe and the resulting changes that took place. The course continues with an exploration of imperialism and provides detailed accounts of World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. It also explores the effects of these major events on various countries in the world, the spread of democracy vs. Communism, nuclear arms, the U.N., the struggle for peace, and the challenges faced by the modern world. With rigor, depth, and breadth of content and assignments, students study industrialization to understand the emergence and impact of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects, and build upon their ability to read, understand, analyze, and write about historical text and documents. Questions, activities, and project-based learning tasks are designed to engage higher order thinking processes and provide opportunities for practical applications of the concepts developed within the course.

While all courses are offered each year, if student interest does not warrant, courses may be cancelled.